Tag Archives: thriller

FEAR ON DEMAND – from the Khekarian threat, out now on Amazon.

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Listen,” he was suddenly harsh. “Until I want your fear it’s useless to me. Ditch it.”

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“ONLY ONES THAT KILL.” – from The Khekarian Threat, out now on Amazon.

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It all looked so opulent, but then that’s what a Bastion was about. Aleisha didn’t care what a Bastion was about. She wanted off this ship. Even here, in this huge generous room, he was too close.

“Sit down.”

She dropped into one of nests.

Sturn chose a place opposite her, making Aleisha want to run again.

“You’re frightened of Khekarians?” he asked.

“Only ones that kill.”

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Now She’s a Slave?

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The Terran working team was not what Aleisha expected.

Within days of her arrival to the wilderness world, they had her pegged, they had her tethered, they had her sold.

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A Bastard in More Ways than One.

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Aleisha had no idea what she was walking into. She had been accepted into a team and had finally arrived on one of the wilderness planets at the distant edge of Terran space colonization. It hadn’t occurred to her that there might be danger waiting.

It crashed in on her unexpectedly before she ever met the team. Proximity allowed a psychic connection just as the murder took place. After that, it was just all too late.

Why is it that people think if a psychic doesn’t see everything, that they can’t see anything?! Aleisha is not believed and, in the team itself, her talents are dismissed by everyone except the very person she needs to escape, the very one who brought her here precisely so he could use her – Sturn, a killer, a Khekarian, an exiled prince and a bastard in more ways than one.

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I call the Khekarian series Science Fiction – You can call it what you like.

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Fantasy, for me, is where belief runs out. It’s on the other side of the demarcation line from reality, that line we draw between what we accept as real and what we don’t. In other words, it’s subjective. We each have our own levels of belief on a wide array of topics. We each have our own demarcation lines.

The Khekarian Series is very much a work of science fiction as far as I am concerned. I base every aspect of my work on realism, on science and on areas of the unknown we are still exploring.

To me, fantasy means talking horses or sponge monsters that show the intelligence equal to our own and whiz around in spaceships they cannot possibly manipulate. I’m sorry, I enjoy realism too much to write that way, it has to be feasible (even if it challenges our acceptances – the glory of discovery is often the surprise it carries in).

While many may agree on my definition of fantasy, some people do not agree with my definition of science fiction. Primarily this is because I have included psychics and a multidimensional alien species in my sci-fi series.

Why do I call these inclusions science fiction?

Psychics, just like witches and shamans, have been recognized, on and off, down through the ages. Their acceptance in society is real and documented, no matter what they can do and whatever your own acceptances are. They are part of human history in all parts of the world. There is no reason to suppose supporting belief will not rise and fall again in the future.

That doesn’t mean I make it easy for my character. Aleisha is more clairsentient (feels touch) than clairvoyant (seeing). That means she picks up trauma in the now, and not future events, so she’s really not the sort of psychic Sturn wants to aid him back into power. In the story, I hit her with every objection a reader might have against psychics. Namely, just about every character who hears of her talent, says the same thing: “Some psychic, right? If she didn’t see them coming, she’s no psychic.”

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Sci-fi – Not their genre of choice. What?

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What if I call it a spaceship and alien science-fiction-action-adventure-thriller with a touch of erotica (not overdone, but what’s there is bloody good), right? Hmmm. Okay.

Science fiction on its own sounds so dry, doesn’t it? An awful lot of people tell me they really liked my book, The Khekarian Threat, even though it’s not their genre of choice. Friends, family members, even complete strangers have told me this. Hey, some got the follow up, The King’s Sacrifice, so I’m doing something write – oops, right – as an author.

I understand people who aren’t attracted to science fiction. I really do. I got into science fiction because I had such a bad time with it as a kid. I hated it. I’ve written elsewhere that whenever I read a book I didn’t enjoy, or saw a movie I thought could be better, I’d rework it in my mind to be the way I wanted it to be. I did that a lot, usually as I drifted off to sleep or when I sat in a boring class (occasionally both at the same time). Most of all I did that with science fiction. That’s how I became a writer.

I wanted science fiction but I didn’t like it because usually it did not give me what I thought science fiction should be. I wanted it to be about people. I wanted it to be about living in space or on new and alien worlds. I wanted it to be exciting and full of exotic challenges. I wanted to feel as though I was there!

[continue reading]

Sci-fi – Not their genre of choice. What?

B42

What if I call it a spaceship and alien science-fiction-action-adventure-thriller with a touch of erotica (not overdone, but what’s there is bloody good), right? Hmmm. Okay.

Science fiction on its own sounds so dry, doesn’t it? An awful lot of people tell me they really liked my book, The Khekarian Threat, even though it’s not their genre of choice. Friends, family members, even complete strangers have told me this. Hey, some got the follow up, The King’s Sacrifice, so I’m doing something write – oops, right – as an author.

I understand people who aren’t attracted to science fiction. I really do. I got into science fiction because I had such a bad time with it as a kid. I hated it. I’ve written elsewhere that whenever I read a book I didn’t enjoy, or saw a movie I thought could be better, I’d rework it in my mind to be the way I wanted it to be. I did that a lot, usually as I drifted off to sleep or when I sat in a boring class (occasionally both at the same time). Most of all I did that with science fiction. That’s how I became a writer.

I wanted science fiction but I didn’t like it because usually it did not give me what I thought science fiction should be. I wanted it to be about people. I wanted it to be about living in space or on new and alien worlds. I wanted it to be exciting and full of exotic challenges. I wanted to feel as though I was there!

[continue reading]